New Single "Sarcophagus" Released 10.31.12

Electric Trombone DJ, Darren Kramer (aka DJ DKO), has released “Sarcophagus
The second single from the upcoming CD "Beyond The Boneyard".
Watch The Video!
DJ DKO Sarcophagus Single Cover copy
Middle-Eastern Electronic Funk feat. Electric Trombone
Available Now for Download on iTunes & CD Baby!

Live DJ Performance for CD Release 12.12.12
Special Multimedia Event at Gates Planetarium
Denver, CO
Buy Tix Now!
ElectricTrombone.com

The few photos used in the video are from Darren's visit to Cairo & The Pyramids of Giza back in 1997. (Yes, that's actually Darren’s trombone being held by a willing local man, as well as Darren playing trombone on the back of a camel!)
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This new solo project "Beyond The Boneyard" is a cutting-edge live performance innovation that pushes the boundaries of the typical trombone stereotype as well as that of the traditional DJ. Kramer (aka DJ DKO) performs an inspiring live DJ remix of originals and covers via Ableton Live looping with electric trombone, virtual synths, vocoder, and the iPad Lemur App! Furthermore, this unique project is enhanced with spectacular visuals created in realtime by utilizing the latest VJ software to combine Kramer's world-class photography and original video with live camera feeds for a truly stunning interactive audio/visual experience. Due to its technological sophistication, "Beyond The Boneyard" is also being taught by Kramer as a popular media arts presentation and workshop in schools throughout the country.

New Video by Request!

Currently I’ve released two videos on my website, Vimeo and YouTube....The first single “Heavy Metal Paperclip” and “What is an Electric Trombone DJ?”. The latter is a descriptive account of what hardware and software I’m using for my solo live looping project “Beyond The Boneyard”. I’ve had several inquiries over the past two weeks about the name of the song which accompanies the flow chart text in the video, and if a full-screen version of the small video embedded is available.

Yes! The song is called “Lemur Femur” and is a single scheduled for release in April, but I’m happily adding the video to the website today. Enjoy!



Incidentally, in coming weeks I will be uploading a few more videos that feature the JazzMutant Lemur hardware multitouch controller as I used in this video. I relied on this magical device heavily from 2009-2011 to control Ableton Live on my MacBook Pro. However, due to the popularity, versatility, size and affordable cost of the Apple iPad, JazzMutant went out of business on Dec 31, 2010. A sad day indeed as this company and its touchscreen technology were clearly years ahead of their time, as the Lemur was quickly adopted by innovative electronic musicians around the world, most notably Bjork. Thankfully, several of the incredible developers have converted the technology into the amazing “Lemur App” which launched on the App Store Dec 7, 2012 for a remarkably low price of $50! ($25 for hardware owners). All my hardware templates were easily imported, and all objects, devices, manual and Lemur Daemon function exactly as before...all on the tiny 6”x9” razor thin iPad2!
Thank you JazzMutant for your innovation and a special thank you to all the software developers who made this new app available...and affordable...for all!
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My New Compact Setup (Using the iPad on a Crane Stand with TheGigEasy iPad Mount)
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The Word for "Paperclip" is "Trombone"!


The French Word for “Paperclip” is “Trombone”
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Article from “Today I Found Out...”
http://www.todayifoundout.com/


The French word for “paperclip” is “trombone”.
The word trombone originally comes from the Italian “tromba”, which comes from the same Latin word, “tromba”, both retaining the same meaning: trumpet.  In this case, the ending with the added “one” (tromb-one), indicates “large”.  So, essentially, trombone means “large trumpet”.  This has been the name of the instrument in Italy likely since its creation, which is probably around the early 15th century.
During its early history, in English, the trombone was known as the “sackbut”, with slight spelling variations including: sacbutte, sagbut, and shagbolt, among others.  This was the case until around the 18th century when the instrument became known as a trombone in English.  This was largely due to the fact that the trombone had fallen out of favor in much of the world, including England, but was brought back into popularity thanks to the influence of Italian music throughout Europe.  During this era, the trombone combined with the cornetto and the organ to be among the most important instruments in polychoral works.
“Clip”, on the other hand, comes from the Old English “clyppan” meaning: to embrace.  Obviously this, combined with “paper” from the Latin “papyrus” (made from papyrus stalks), gave birth to the word paperclip.
Interestingly, the common style of paperclip today was never patented and is known as the “Gem paperclip”.  Not surprisingly, it is thought to have first been manufactured by the Gem Manufacturing Company around the 1870s and later introduced to the United States around the 1890s.  This is also why the Swedish word for paperclip is “gem”.
One very popular false origin of the paperclip was that it was invented by Norwegian patent office manager, Johan Vaaler.  He was even granted patents in Germany and the U.S. for a paperclip of similar design as the Gem style paperclip, but which came after the Gem paperclip was already popular throughout Europe.  His design was slightly different than the Gem paperclip in that it didn’t include the all too critical second loop that makes the Gem style much more functional.  His paperclip had the papers inserted by lifting the outer wire slightly and pushing the papers into the clip such that the rest of the clip stood out from the paper at a 90 degree angle, which was necessary because of the lack of the critical second loop to allow the papers to be more or less embedded in the clip flatly.  This also made it so the papers wouldn’t be held together very well as they relied only on how bendable the wire used was to hold the papers. The Gem style paperclip, on the other hand, exploits the torsion principle to help bind papers together. Vaaler’s design was never manufactured or sold and his patents eventually expired.
Why Vaaler gets the credit in so many places, including in many encyclopedias and dictionaries after the 1950s, is largely thanks to a patent agency worker who was visiting Germany to register Norwegian patents in the 1920s.  When he was doing so, he noticed Vaaler’s design for the paperclip and wrote an article stating Vaaler was the original creator of the paperclip.
This misinformation found its way into encyclopedias around the 1950s thanks to WWII.  During WWII in Norway particularly, along with France and some other occupied countries, the paperclip became a symbol of unity for those rebelling against the Germans.  It is not thought that the Norwegians did this because they thought a Norwegian had invented the paperclip, but rather because it simply signified being bound together and was useful as it wasn’t initially a banned symbol or item by the Germans and could be easily clipped to one’s clothing.  Eventually, the Germans caught on and people were prohibited from wearing paperclips.
After the war, the fact that the Gem style paperclip had served as a symbol of unity resulted in interest in the origin of the paperclip, at which point the article written by the patent agency worker and the subsequent patent by Vaaler, who was now long dead, was discovered.  It was overlooked, of course, that his design was different than the Gem style paperclip and apparently they didn’t bother checking that the Gem style paperclip had already been around by the time Vaaler patented his version of the paperclip.  It made a good story though, particularly after the war and how the paperclip was used in Norway among other places, and so this false origin subsequently found its way into many encyclopedias.